Why my last year of work before FI is turning out to be the hardest…and how I’m surviving it.

After a decade of working the career ladder, spending conscientiously, running the numbers, and daydreaming about the day I get to call it quits, I’m now one year away from reaching my financial independence goals.

It feels really good. But, it also makes for a serious case of Senioritis. I’ve spent the last six months in a state of extreme negativity towards my job. My job was always a means towards an end, but in the past I found satisfaction and even enjoyment in parts of it. Now, the work week is a source of dread. And instead of my stress-levels dissipating as I near the end, they’ve skyrocketed. Every incoming email or additional responsibility becomes yet another thing I have to get through before I get to move onto my “real” life.

It’d be natural to accept that this last year is just something I have to grind through. But I’ve decided that’s not good enough for me. First, a year is still a long time. I spend too many hours at my job to accept that there’s no option but to suffer through it. Second, I firmly believe happiness is a choice. It’s not my job itself that makes me suffer; it’s my attitude towards it. And whose to say that even after I remove my job from the equation, I won’t face other things in life that I wish I weren’t there?

Happiness comes from embracing reality as it is in this moment. So how I am embracing my current reality, which includes showing up at an office every day to a demanding job?

What I’m doing to not only survive, but thrive, in my last year of work:

  • Find “one thing” you want to accomplish in your career before you leave, and let everything else go. My one thing is to be a kick-ass manager, which means helping my team grow professionally and personally. At this point, delivering project X or achieving business goal Y really has no meaning to me. But people always matter, and I still have an opportunity to make a meaningful impact in my remaining year as their boss. The hard part is letting the rest go, because it WILL get uncomfortable if you’re used to always being on top of everything. But embrace the chaos. It’s the way to peace.
  • Change up your work situation so you can find new challenges to be excited about. I really couldn’t bear the thought of dragging myself through the same 1hr+ commute, to the same campus, and in the same business unit as I have been working for the last decade. So I took an international transfer to Zurich, Switzerland. On top of giving my family a whole new adventure and an opportunity to live in Europe, I also got a 30% bump in salary for cost of living adjustment. Awesome!
  • If you can, reduce your hours. It’s probably better financially to stay at your job and work part-time than quit prematurely because you just can’t take it anymore. Last month, I moved to 90% time which means I work from home Friday mornings and take off Friday afternoons. While it’s only a 10% reduction in time and pay, it’s made at least a 25% increase in my everyday happiness.
  • Start living your post-FI life now. After writing my “Ten Year Plan for a Remarkable Life,” I realised that my ideal life is actually quite simple and achievable today. So instead of daydreaming about everything I’m going to do with all my post-FI free time, I try to live that life now as much as possible. These include: Daily time for exercise and meditation. Luxurious breakfasts with the family. Reading and writing (including this blog) for pleasure. World travel (yes for Switzerland!).

Life is too short and unpredictable to defer your happiness to post-FI. What are you doing to find joy in your situation today?

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